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NATURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT

The Natural Resources Department handles various natural resource activities and related concerns. The activities include, but not limited to, forest resource activity and mining, oil and gas exploration and development.
The Natural Resources Department works diligently with the Lheidli T’enneh Chief and Council which plays an integral component at the Nation level. The Natural Resources Department also provides Geographical Information System (GIS) analysis to provide a range of mapping services to the Lheidli T’enneh Nation.

Staff

Chus Natlo Sam

Chus Natlo Sam - Natural Resources Manager

Phone: 250.562-0847 ext. 201| Fax: 250.562-2198 | E-mail

Chusnatlo Sam comes from the Maiyoo Keyoh, member of Nak’azdli Indian Band, and Lhts’umusyoo Clan (Beaver). He grew up with his grandmother in Fort St. James and also lived in Williams Lake prior to coming to Prince George in 2014 to work for Lheidli T’enneh. He has a Natural Resources Technician certificate from Nicola Valley Institute of Technology (NVIT) that was completed in 2010. In addition, he has completed several UNBC courses for Natural Resource Management and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Since 2010, he has worked for Nak’azdli Resource Office, Xat’sull Natural Resources office, and Williams Lake Indian Band Natural Resource Office.

His experience is related to Natural Resource Management, technical field work, GIS, Traditional Use Studies, First Nation strength of claim and history. He has worked with his community as the youth representative for the Nak’azdli Council-Keyoh MOU working group. In addition, he volunteers his time for the Maiyoo Keyoh Society and is on the Board of Directors.

 

Gary Seymour- Assistant Natural Resources Referrals Officer

Phone: 250.562-0847 ext. 204| Fax: 250.562-2198 | E-mail

 

LHEIDLI T’ENNEH TERRITORY

We are the Lheidli T’enneh. Our name translates as “people from where the rivers flow together.” The rivers spoken of are the Nee Incha Koh which means “river with strong undercurrents” and the Ltha Koh, the Big Mouth River. These rivers area known as the Nechako and the Fraser. We were often called the Tanoten which meant “people a little to the north.”

Traditional Territory

 

CONSULTATION AND ACCOMODATION

A referral consists of a consultation package submitted by the government or proponent to establish a process regarding a proposed development that may impact Lheidli Title and Rights – ranging from duty to consult to accommodation. We examine referrals from environmental, social and archaeological perspectives and use this data to provide recommendations on whether or not to support the referrals.
Research assists us to make recommendations on how to reduce impacts to environment, heritage and social impacts on projects. We also work with the Lheidli T’enneh Economic Development Department to ensure collaboration of potential projects are in the best interests of our nation.
These concerns are presented to the proponent and mitigation and accommodation aspects are discussed and agreed upon.

 

TITLE AND RIGHTS - Crown Procedures for Meeting Legal Obligations

The Province of British Columbia has a duty to consult and where required, accommodate First Nations whenever it proposes a decision or activity that could impact treaty rights or aboriginal rights (including title) - claimed or proven. The duty stems from court decisions and is consistent with the Province's commitment to building a new relationship with First Nations.

Crown Procedures for Meeting Legal Obligations
PDF (800kb)

 

LHEIDLI T’ENNEH REFERRALS PROCEDURE


PDF file of the Referral Procedure below

LT_ReferralProcedure_2019

 

ARCHAEOLOGY AND CULTURAL HERITAGE

Lheidli T’enneh has various relationships with local archaeological companies. We ensure appropriate assessments are completed with participation and training components for our membership. Archaeological sites are critical to the history of Lheidli T’enneh and the connection to the land.
The Provincial Government recognizes the importance of archaeological sites through the Heritage Conservation Act. Under this Act, the Archaeology Branch is responsible for maintaining and distributing archaeological information and deciding if permits can be issued to allow development to take place within protected sites.

 

FORESTRY

We consult with local major forest companies and review harvesting and road building activities. Through this technical review, we ensure the protection of the following aspects; continued traditional use, archaeology, environment and wildlife.
Herbicides - We submitted a letter on March 16, 2016 to the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operation and Rural Development and local forest companies stating “we do not support the use of Herbicides such as Glyphosate (Round up) within Lheidli T’enneh Territory”. We are currently awaiting a formal response from the provincial government
Forestry Road Closures and Deactivations - link to the FSR online maps that shows deactivations and road closures. If you click on the symbols, it will provide additional information about the issue and when planned repair is. This will work on a cell phone using an android system.

 

MINES

Graymont Giscome - The proposed Giscome Quarry and Lime Plant project is located in Giscome, British Columbia, about 45 minutes northeast of Prince George in the Regional District of Fraser-Fort George. The Giscome project will include a limestone quarry, a lime processing facility and a conveyor that will move crushed limestone from the quarry to the plant site. The location of the quarry and plant site is illustrated in the map below:

Graymont Mine Site

Limestone Quarry Site

 

PARKS

BC Parks Map - Omineca Region

  • 1. Aleza Lake Ecological Reserve
  • 2. Arctic Pacific Lakes Park
  • 3. Bobtail Mountain Park
  • 4. Bowron Lake Park
  • 5. Caribou Mountain Park
  • 6. Close to the Edge Protected Area
  • 7. Dahl Lake Park
  • 8. Ecological Reserve
  • 9. Erg Mountain
  • 10. Eskers Park
  • 11. Evanoff Park
  • 12. Fort George Canyon
  • 13. Fraser River Park
  • 14. Giscome Portage Trail
  • 15. Holiday Creek Arch Protected Areas
  • 16. Jackman Flats Park
  • 17. Kakwa Park
  • 18. Monkman Park
  • 19. Mount Robson Park
  • 20. Nechako River
  • 21. Ptarmigan Creek
  • 22. Purden Lake Park
  • 23. Slim Creek Park
  • 24. Small River Caves Park
  • 25. Stuart River Park
  • 26. Sugar Bowl Grizzly Den Park
  • 27. Sunbeam Creek Ecological Reserve
  • 28. Three Sisters Lake Park
  • 29. Upper Raush
  • 30. Wapiti Lake Park
  • 31. West Lake Park
  • 32. West Twin Park
  • 33. Wells Gray Park

 

Chun T’oh Whudujut/Ancient Forest Provincial Park - Within the traditional territory of the Lheidli T’enneh, the Park protects a portion of the only inland temperate rainforest in the world. Hiking the Ancient Forest trail will bring you past thousand year old western red cedars and a rich biodiversity of plants, mosses, lichens and fungi. Lheidli T’enneh is currently collaborating with BC Parks to co-develop the Park Management Plans.
The 450 metre long universal access boardwalk provides the opportunity for people with all abilities to experience this majestic area. Another 2.3 km of boardwalk provides access to magnificent “Big” Tree, Tree Beard, Radies Tree and a beautiful cascading waterfall.

 

TRADITIONAL USE

Lheidli T’enneh has conducted multiple Traditional Use Studies related to forest harvesting, pipeline projects, and a mining project. We have extensive data showing continued use of Lheidli T’enneh within the territory. This information captures a snapshot in time of Lheidli T’enneh use on the land and we maintain this data. This data may be utilized to inform and prevent impacts to membership rights and interests.
Traditional Use and Interest Study Work Plan - October 14 2016
View PDF (186kb)

 

WILDLIFE

Moose - Updates on provincial moose research in the Omineca region: A comprehensive 5 year moose study that investigates recent moose population declines in B.C’s interior is underway.

2017 Progress Report – Determining Factors Affecting Moose Population Change in British Columbia
View PDF (3,638kb)

2016 Provincial Moose Research in the Omineca Region
View PDF (971kb)

2013 – 2018 Moose Management Plan
View PDF (495kb)

Wolf - Updates on predation in North Central B.C.
View PDF (1,231kb)

 

PHYSICAL ADDRESS

Lheidli T’enneh Economic Development
215 George St.
Prince George BC V2L 1R1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Contact Us...

1041 Whenun Road
Prince George, BC • V2K 5X8

Phone: 250.963.8451
Toll-Free: 1.877.963.8451
Fax: 250.963.6954

Click here to contact us via e-mail.

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